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The exceptional Quorn floods of 1875

Although Quorn had always flooded, July 1875 saw the worst floods that the village had had for many years. The following articles appeared in the newspapers. William Brown, a Quorn saddler, was killed helping his neighbour at the White Horse inn trying to rescue his possessions.

Leicester Journal Friday 23rd July 1875
LOUGHBOROUGH. – This town was visited on Tuesday last, by a terrific storm, which commenced about half-past four o’clock in the afternoon, and lasted till after ten. There was the greatest consternation throughout the place – it being rumoured that the reservoir had burst. . . . The devastation is not confined to Loughborough, for we learn that at Quorndon the stream passed through one part of the village with the greatest of impetuosity, attended with the sacrifice of life. At this place there is a third water-course from the forest, running through the property of E.B. Farnham, Esq. This property is bounded by a high stone wall, and the water passes through wide iron gratings at the bottom, and there not being sufficient space for such a large volume, of water to pass, it had accumulated to a great height, and the wall gave way causing the water to rush across the road into and through the houses on the opposite side of the road. Mr. Brown, of the White Horse Inn, assisted by Mr. Brown, saddler, were getting some furniture out of the lower rooms to the bed rooms. The latter having occasion to go into the passage just as the wall fell, the water rushed in, and he was carried away into the back yard and was drowned. The body was founded on Wednesday morning by P.C. Higgs, who is stationed at the village. At Dishley it was rumoured that the mill was washed down, but this is a mistake. It is said, however, that all the sheds and outbuilding have been swept away. The brook that supplies the mill is one of the three principal streams whose source is the forest hills. A second runs through Loughborough, and a third through Quorndon. We learn that Mr. Brown leaves a wife and five children to mourn his loss. . . .

Leicester Journal Friday 6th August 1875
QUORNDON. – A subscription is being raised here for the widow and family of Mr. Brown, saddler, who lost his life during the recent flood. Subscriptions will be received by Mr. Oliver Brown, landlord of the White Horse Inn, Quorndon.

Leicester Journal Friday 13th August 1875
Nottingham Journal Saturday 14th August 1875

QUORNDON. – On Saturday afternoon last, a heavy thunderstorm passed over this village, a fireball falling through the roof of one of the stables connected with the White Horse Inn, in the possession of Mr. O. Brown, and the roof being thatched, it caught fire, but luckily there were a number of people about, so that it was soon extinguished without much damage being done. Had this occurred in the night, it is very probable that the whole of the premises would have been destroyed. – The subscriptions in aid of the widow and eight children of the late Wm. Brown, of Quorndon, who was so unfortunately drowned during the recent floods amount to £23 7s. 7d.

   
 Submitted on: 2024-01-05
 Submitted by: Christine Sibcey
 Artefact ID: 2564
 Artefact URL: www.quornmuseum.com/display.php?id=2564
 Print: View artefact in printer-friendly page

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