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Sunday 18th November 2018  

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Quorn Amateur Dramatic Society -

Loughborough Echo - 2nd February 1962

This comedy of the Williamses (Hugh and Margaret) is as light, slight and attractive as it title. But its atmosphere of well-bred sang-froid, old-school-tie, and landed, though impecunious, gentry is one which is not easy for amateurs to establish - not, of course, that amateurs do not understand breeding, but because the polished style of "throw-away" acting needs a tremendous amount of technique and experience for its proper fulfilment.

The Quorn A.D.S really did astonishingly well and for a good deal of the time had the play very well in hand. With a little more variety of pace and, if possible, a reduction in the time between scenes, Christine Harris's production would have left little to be desired.

Eileen Pick brought an alluring voice and engaging manner to the part of Lady Susan Creel, to whom the impressionable Lord Plymlimmon had, quite understandingly, lost his susceptible heart (for the second time in a matter of weeks). Mike Allen as his lordship was comfortably relaxed - perhaps a shade too much so - and they got through the difficult love-scene in act one with its rather banal dialogue fairly smoothly.

As his father, the Earl of Hewlyn, Albert Morgan was lively, even boisterous at times, but showed a creditable paternal devotion in his determination to save his son from the embarrassment of having too many belles to his ring - and solved the problem with delicacy and discernment.

Mavis Bilton, in the title role, gave a nice study of self-possession mingled with sweet reasonableness and contrived to suggest a little of the underlying hard-baked lady journalist- though of course her final capitulation was pure femininity. Very popular was Steven Harze's Watkyn - the faithful gamekeeper-butler, full of music and cunning Celtic imagery. Mr Harze is evidently a man of much energy and many parts, taking in his stride such little matters as stage-managing, "electrics" and business manager.

   
 Submitted on: 2011-01-07
 Submitted by: Kathryn Paterson
 Artefact ID: 1144
 Print: View artefact in printer-friendly page

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